Soldering vs. Brazing

We receive many inquiries to silver solder, solder or braze components and many times there is confusion over this terminology and the various materials and processes used to bond metals, ceramic and/or glasses. This short article offers some clarification to the distinctions between soldering and brazing such that you can make informed decisions about your needs. Read more about Soldering vs. Brazing

Mechanical Activation of Active Solders

Mechanical vs Chemical Fluxing During Solder Bonding

Flux is derived from Latin word fluxus meaning “flow.” In solder joining (also  aluminum soldering, graphite bonding, ceramic to metal brazing, etc.), a flux facilitates wetting by molten metals disrupting oxides on metal surfaces which interrupt the reaction/interaction of the molten solder metals with the underlying metal. Additionally, flux allows solder to flow easily on the working piece rather than forming beads as it would otherwise. Read more about Mechanical Activation of Active Solders

Joining Dissimilar Materials

The Issue of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) Mismatch

Yes, S-Bond can join a wide variety of materials, including aluminum, copper, stainless steel, refractory metals and ceramic to metal brazing with aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, silicon carbide and other oxide, nitrides and carbides… however, with this wide variety of materials joining capability, we have a lot of inquiries about aluminum soldering to stainless steel or aluminum oxide, graphite bonding to aluminum, titanium to silicon carbide, etc. Read more about Joining Dissimilar Materials

Ceramic to Metal Bonding

S-Bond® active solders enable ceramic to metal bonding and sapphire to metal bonding as well as to each other. S-Bond alloys have active elements such as titanium and cerium added to Sn-Ag, Sn-In-Ag, and Sn-Bi alloys to create a solder that can be reacted directly with the ceramic and sapphire surfaces prior to bonding. S-Bond alloys produce reliable, hermetic joints with all metals…including steel, stainless steels, titanium, nickel alloys, copper and aluminum alloys. Read more about Ceramic to Metal Bonding

S-Bond Develops Fluxless “Hybrid” Soldering Techniques

Hybrid S-Bond joining processes eliminate the use of fluxes and have been shown to be more effective since it completely joins with the S-Bond filler metals. The methods that are recommended to minimize the use of S-Bond, yet still achieve fluxless joining are as follows: Read more about S-Bond Develops Fluxless “Hybrid” Soldering Techniques

S-Bond Active Solder Bonding

S-Bond was developed between 1995 – 2005 during which the materials and process technology has progressed to encompass the joining of most metals, semiconductors, ceramics and many composites of metals/ceramics. Key to the success of S-Bond active solders are they contain combinations of active metals such as titanium with rare earths such as cerium. These very active solders permit fluxless joining and eliminates the need for Ni or Cu plating before solder joining. SBT has also developed methods to actively solder bond and hermetically seal ceramics such as Al2O3, sapphire, quartz and zirconia. Please review our website, www.s-bond.com and take a look at our brochure and technical literature on the site. We would appreciate if you would share this blog and our website with your colleagues and customers, as S-Bond is an excellent solution for many dissimilar materials bonding applications. Read more about S-Bond Active Solder Bonding